Fuck Yeah Lesbian Literature (and more)!

I also run the book blog The Lesbrary and my personal tumblr is danikasapphistry. Check out the Lesbrary Goodreads Project for lists of les/bi/etc books by topic and genre!

Please submit!
Apr 15 '14

32 notes Tags: queer lgbt lgbtq sci fi sff science fiction fantasy

Apr 15 '14
Hannah reviews The Dark Wife by Sarah Diemer

The Dark Wife is a retelling of the ancient Greek myth involving Persephone and Hades. This myth is one of my favorites, so I picked up its reinterpretation eagerly.

Hannah reviews The Dark Wife by Sarah Diemer

The Dark Wife is a retelling of the ancient Greek myth involving Persephone and Hades. This myth is one of my favorites, so I picked up its reinterpretation eagerly.

20 notes Tags: Hannah sarah diemer

Apr 14 '14
[image description: a watercolour illustration of the quotation “I laughed and said, Life is easy. What I meant was, Life is easy with you here, and when you leave, it will be hard again.” - Mirandy July]
conniecann:

[prints]

[image description: a watercolour illustration of the quotation “I laughed and said, Life is easy. What I meant was, Life is easy with you here, and when you leave, it will be hard again.” - Mirandy July]

conniecann:

[prints]

319 notes (via conniecann)

Apr 14 '14

Anonymous asked:

can you recommend some good lesbian pirate books?

Check out this Good Lesbian Books post!

33 notes

Apr 14 '14

queenxtine asked:

Re: "Make books your girlfriend" - There should be a huuuuge disclaimer for Burmudez Triangle. I haven't read the Difference Between You and Me, but The Bermudez Triangle is pretty upfront about how it feels about bisexuality.

I don’t know how I missed that, since we’ve talked about The Bermudez Triangle on FYLL quite a bit! Well, that probably makes that post not worth reblogging; I’ll just delete it. Thanks for reminding me!

2 notes

Apr 14 '14

Want More Diversity in Your YA? Here’s How You Can Help

diversityinya:

Within the last few weeks, the  New York TimesEntertainment Weekly, and CNN have all published articles examining the lack of diversity in children’s and young adult literature — and next month, School Library Journal plans to publish an entire issue devoted to diversity. While all this mainstream interest in diversity is to be applauded for bringing more people into the ongoing conversation about diversity, they still largely fail to tackle the problem of how we can change the status quo.

We at Diversity in YA obviously don’t have all the answers, and we aren’t the first people to talk about these issues. This conversation has been going on for decades. What we do have are ideas for how you can change the status quo right now. If you’re an ordinary reader, you don’t have to wait to show your support for books that show the world as it is. Here are five ways you can help make positive change right now:

1. Look for diversity. 

Make a conscious effort to seek out books to read that feature characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters. They may not be front-and-center at your local Barnes & Noble; you may have to look around a bit or go online to find them.

2. Support diversity.

Support the diverse books that are published today by buying them, by checking them out at your library, or by requesting that your library buy them.

3. Recommend diversity.

If you use Goodreads, Facebook, social media, or have a blog, talk up the books you love that happen to have diverse characters. Tell your friends! Word of mouth is still key in bringing awareness to books. And remember: You don’t need to recommend them solely for their diversity — they’re great books to enjoy, plain and simple.

4. Talk up diversity.

When discussions around diversity in literature occur online, join in the conversation if you can to express that you do want more diverse books to read and that the issue is important to you.

5. Don’t give up.

There will always be people who dismiss “diversity” as meaningless. They are the reason we must keep fighting for representation. We’re all in this together.

* * *

Want a list of diverse YA books you can get started reading right now? Here are a dozen YA books of all kinds (contemporary, fantasy, sci-fi, mystery — something for everyone!) that happen to have characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters.

Want even more book lists? Here’s a link to all of our book lists.

1,054 notes (via diversityinya)

Apr 14 '14
[image description: the cover of Adrienne: A Poetry Journal of Queer Women, Issue 02. It features a photo of someone walking through waist-high water]
adriennejournal:

Pre-Order Adrienne Issue 2 NOW! 
Featuring cover art by Ashley Inguanta and a portfolio of work from established and emerging self-identified queer women poets. Included in this issue is a significant amount of work from Alysia Angel, Jessica Rae Bergamino, Tamiko Beyer, Sossity Chircuzio, Cheryl Clarke, Theresa Davis, Leah Horlick, Laura Passin, Anne Marie Rooney, and Arisa White. Issue 02 features cover art by Ashley Inguanta. Edited by Valerie Wetlaufer and proudly published by Sibling Rivalry Press.

[image description: the cover of Adrienne: A Poetry Journal of Queer Women, Issue 02. It features a photo of someone walking through waist-high water]

adriennejournal:

Pre-Order Adrienne Issue 2 NOW! 

Featuring cover art by Ashley Inguanta and a portfolio of work from established and emerging self-identified queer women poets. Included in this issue is a significant amount of work from Alysia Angel, Jessica Rae Bergamino, Tamiko Beyer, Sossity Chircuzio, Cheryl Clarke, Theresa Davis, Leah Horlick, Laura Passin, Anne Marie Rooney, and Arisa White. Issue 02 features cover art by Ashley Inguanta. Edited by Valerie Wetlaufer and proudly published by Sibling Rivalry Press.

51 notes (via adriennejournal)

Apr 14 '14

[image description: a banner with the Lambda Literary logo. Underneath are the covers of the books listed below]

bimagazine:

Finalists of the 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards: Bisexual Fiction

Looking for the very best in contemporary Bisexual Thought & Bisexual Culture? Look no further than the Eight Finalists in the Bisexual Categories of the Lambda Literary Foundation Awards.

Now in their Twenty-Sixth Year, the Lambda Literary Awards honor achievement in LGBTQ writing for books published in 2013. This year our community has a wonderful selection, with Five Books in the Bisexual Fiction Category and Three Books in the Bisexual Nonfiction Category.

Every one of them a winner and all well worth your time and attention!

Finalists of the 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards in the category Bisexual Fiction are:

Click HERE to read the full article

303 notes (via bisexual-books & bimagazine)

Apr 14 '14

mykastesla asked:

The Miseducation of Cameron Post is by emily m. danforth, not elizabeth m. danforth-very good book.

It is a good book! I didn’t notice that, I’ve fixed the reblog now

4 notes

Apr 14 '14

Jess reviews Babyji by Abha Dawesar

babyji

Babyji (2005) by Abha Dawesar is an atypical ‘coming of age’ novel featuring an academically gifted, sexually empowered female protagonist Anamika Sharma. Dawesar returns to her Indian roots, placing Anamika in the heart of a class-divided Delhi, juggling the pressures of being both a student and a lover.

This is an unapologetic exploration of the wanton desires of a sexually active teenager…

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12 notes Tags: Abha Dawesar Jess